Categories
History and Culture Politics

Book Recommendation: The Good Immigrant

The Good Immigrant is a rich and powerful collection of 21 readable and personal essays by 21 non-white British writers exploring what it means to be Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic in Britain today. These writers tell stories about trying to find their place in a world (read: country) where “the default is always white”. […]

Advertisement

Categories
Business and Economics

LUNGU-NOMICS: Zambia’s Post-Election Economy (by Hjoe Moono)

History has been made once again in Zambia. Since Frederick Chiluba, President Elect H.E. Edgar Chagwa Lungu is the only president to be elected by a vote of over 50%. Marginal as 50.3% might seem, it speaks volumes, and indeed, congratulations are in order to the Head of State and his party, the ruling Patriotic […]

Categories
Musings The Christian Life

A Hero

Note: 09 July 2016 So much hurt has been inflicted upon people in recent days…in Istanbul, Dhaka, Harare, Medina, Baton Rouge, etc. I wrote this last night to help me process all that’s going on. We Need A Hero.

Categories
Politics

Mugabe’s people have had enough.

In a moment of deep frustration this April, Evan Mawarire, a pastor based in Zimbabwe’s capital of Harare, set his camera to record. Draped in the Zimbabwean flag, the emotional 39-year-old looked into the lens and spoke for over 4 minutes about his weariness at what he saw as the government’s failures and broken promises […]

Categories
Musings The Arts The Christian Life

Why I Write and Lessons from Five Years of Blogging

This blog post is based on a talk I recently gave to a small group of people from my local church. It was part of an event we run for those in their 20s and 30s. The event is based loosely on the TED Talks format. Each speaker seeks to challenge and encourage those listening […]

Categories
History and Culture

The Zambian “Afro chic” industry: A socio-economic perspective

As I pushed the shop door open, the bell chimed announcing to the duty staff that customers had arrived. The three of us – my sister Tawonga, my now wife Emily, and I – entered and briefly waited for someone to appear.